Tag Archives: Large-cap

Hennessy Funds Outperform With Active Management

More than 70% of actively managed U.S. stock funds lagged their benchmarks over the five years ended June 30, according to the S&P Dow Jones Indices Versus Active (SPIVA) U.S. scorecard.

Hennessy Funds were an exception. Over those five years, nearly 70% of Hennessy’s funds beat their benchmark on an annualized basis.

The SPIVA U.S. scorecard measures performance of actively managed funds against their relevant S&P index in the stock market.

“The past five years (through June 30) have been marked by the rare combination of a remarkable rebound in domestic equity markets and a low-volatility equity environment,” Aye Soe, senior director, Index Research & Design, S&P Dow Jones Indices, wrote in the SPIVA report. Soe added, “This combination has proven difficult for domestic equity managers… across all capitalization and style categories.”

Among U.S. equity funds, 60% of large-cap, 58% of midcap and 73% of small-cap managers underperformed their benchmarks, according to SPIVA.

Managers of international equity fared worse. About 70% of global equity funds, 75% of foreign equity funds, 81% of foreign small-cap funds and 65% of emerging market funds lagged their benchmarks.

Yet of Hennessy Advisors’ 16 funds, which run $5.7 billion, six outperformed their indices for the 12 months ended June 30.

On a five-year annualized basis, 11 funds beat their benchmarks net of fees. Six of the 11 turned over their portfolios just once a year.

“It’s not timing the market, it’s your time in the market,” said Neil Hennessy, the firm’s president, chairman and chief investment officer. “We buy the stocks with a highly disciplined formula, and we hold for a year with no emotions. Then we do it again.”

The two best performers are Hennessy Japan Fund and Hennessy Japan Small Cap Fund.

Over the 12 months that ended June 30, the small-cap fund gained 28.68% vs. the Russell/Nomura Small Cap Index’s 17.21%, says Morningstar. Over the past five years, the fund’s annualized return of 15.13% beat the index’s 9.87% .

The Japan Fund’s 17.54% gain over the past year beat the Russell/Nomura Total Market Index’s 10.86% gain. The fund’s 14.40% five-year average annual return topped the index’s 7.48%.

Among U.S. equity funds, Hennessy Cornerstone Mid Cap 30 gained the most over the 12-month period. Its 31.95% outperformed the Russell MidCap Index’s 26.85%. On a five-year annualized basis, the fund returned 22.32%, beating the index’s 22.07%.

Hennessy Cornerstone Large Growth rose 29.35% over the 12 months ended June 30, exceeding the Russell 1000 Index’s 25.35%. Its five-year average annual return of 19.48% beat the index’s 19.25%.
Hennessy’s best funds over the five years held bonds and stocks. Hennessy Total Return Fund, at 75% equity and 25% bonds, beat the 75/25 Blended DJIA/Treasury Index 15.19% vs. 13.41% on an annualized basis.

Hennessy Core Bond’s 5.42% return outpaced the Barclays U.S. Government/Credit Intermediate Index’s 4.09%.

As for volatility, over the past five years each outperformer beat its bogey four years; the Mid Cap 30 outperformed just three years.

For the full story go to Investor’s Business Daily.

WisdomTree Now Offers Growth

Nice ticker symbol.

WisdomTree on Thursday launched the LargeCap Growth Fund (ROI) on the NYSE Arca. ROI is usually the symbol for “return on investment.” Nice score on WisdomTree’s part.

The new ETF is designed to track the WisdomTree LargeCap Growth Index. This fundamentally-weighted index measures the performance of approximately 300 domestic large-cap growth companies. Each company’s weighting is set annually and based on the earnings generated during the prior four fiscal quarters. The ETF has an expense ratio of 0.38%.

WisdomTree, the market leader in fundamentally-weighted indexes, is best known for its family of ETFs based on dividends-weighted indexes. This isn’t the firm’s first earnings-based ETF, it launched a few others earlier in the year. But it is a radical departure for WisdomTree. It’s the first growth-oriented fund in this value-oriented firm. Not only is this WisdomTree’s first fund focused on growth stocks, but it’s the first growth-oriented ETF among all the Fundamentalists, those fund families with indexes based on fundamental metrics.

One big disadvantage of dividend-based ETFs is that they ignore strong companies that refuse to pay out dividends, such as technology companies. Earnings-based indexes, and especially growth funds, have the potential to expand WisdomTree’s customer base by offering an ETF with some of the fastest growing companies in the world, such as Google.

Jeremy Siegel, famed professor of the Wharton Business School and a senior advisor to WisdomTree, said in a written statement, “I devoted the first chapter of my book, The Future for Investors, to what I call the ‘Growth Trap,’ the long-standing problem of investors paying too much for the future prospects of growth companies.”

One assumes the new ETF digs itself out of the “Growth Trap”, but WisdomTree didn’t elaborate. The company did say, “growth’s historic underperformance may have more to do with how the major growth indexes are constructed, than with growth stocks themselves.”